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Wanderings, South and East Walter Coote

Wanderings, South and East

Walter Coote

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230416342
Paperback
116 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ... build, another doMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ... build, another do joinery, a third make boats. The women were no less useful, waiting neatly and well at table, keeping the house clean and iu good order, milking the cows, making butter, cooking and the like. There are two traders on the island, who collect from the natives such fungus, copra, &c., as they may have, and give them in exchange tobacco, calicoes, and so on. One of these men had built himself a small cutter of about six tons burdeu, in which I arranged to go to Noumea. I rode across the island to the bay where we had landed from the Southern Cross some months before, and embarked on my tiny vessel at sunset on a lovely evening. We had three natives to help in working the little cutter, the owner and myself occupying the toy cabin aft. There was U heavy sea in the passage between the Loyalty group and New Caledonia, but not much wind- the result was we knocked about in a manner that was positively awful. When daylight broke in the morning we were out of sight of land, and in a very unsatisfactory position. For the greater part of the day we tossed listlessly about on the open sea, but a wind springing up in the afternoon, we made the high land, and steered up towards the entrance known as Havannah Passage. The tide running through this pass was very strong, and as it met the easterly wind, formed a curious sea resembling a whirlpool to which I remember having seen nothing similar, unless it were the Niagara river below the falls. To steer in between this curiously-broken water and the raging breakers on the reef required no small amount of skill, and once or twice it seemed as though one of the great waves would surely break on the weather side of us, in which case our little cutter would have fared indifferently well, I...